Author Archive

walvoord.rubric

December 14, 2012

Rubrics: What Are They Good For?

Barbara E. Walvoord, Ph.D.

Professor Emerita, University of Notre Dame

Mailing address: 130 Woodcock Rd., Williamstown, MA 01267.    E-mail:

walvoord@nd.edu

 

http://www.neasc.org/downloads/walvoord_plenary_handout.pdf

Generic Rubric for Writing in Multiple Disciplines

Categories and Criteria  5Few or no weak-nesses found;

writer satisfied the criteria with distinction

 

4Strengths outweigh the weaknesses; writer shows sound understanding of criteria

 

3Strengths and weaknesses are about equal; writer shows awareness of criteria

 

2Weaknesses outweigh strengths; writer shows limited understanding

of criteria

 

1Weaknesses far outweigh strengths; writer does not show understanding of criteria

 

1.CONTENT 
a.The paper fulfills the assignmentand addresses its audience’s needs.

 

b.Supporting evidence isdeveloped and analyzed sufficiently.

 

c.The thesis is clear. 
d.Sources are appropriatelydocumented.

 

II.ORGANIZATION/STRUCTURE

 

a.Introduction is fully developedand leads smoothly to thesis.

 

b.Body paragraphs use topicsentences effectively.

 

c.Paper is unified in relation tothesis.

 

Ho institution current.4

Categories and Criteria  5Few or no weak-nesses found;

writer satisfied the criteria with distinction

 

4Strengths outweigh the weaknesses; writer shows sound understanding of criteria

 

3Strengths and weaknesses are about equal; writer shows awareness of criteria

 

2Weaknesses outweigh strengths; writer shows limited understanding

of criteria

 

1Weaknesses far outweigh strengths; writer does not show understanding of criteria

 

d.Conclusion provides insightfulclosure

 

III.WRITING STYLE/EXPRESSION

 

a.Vocabulary and tone areappropriate to the assignment.

 

b.The meaning of the sentences isclear.

 

c.Sentence structure is varied. 
d.Transitions create smooth flowof ideas.

 

IV.GRAMMAR/ MECHANICS 
a.Sentences are grammaticallycorrect.

 

b.Punctuation is correct. 
c.Spelling is correct (e.g.homonyms used correctly).

 

d.Paper format is correct. 

Ho institution current.4

10

Categories and Criteria  5Few or no weak-nesses found;

writer satisfied the criteria with distinction

 

4Strengths outweigh the weaknesses; writer shows sound understanding of criteria

 

3Strengths and weaknesses are about equal; writer shows awareness of criteria

 

2Weaknesses outweigh strengths; writer shows limited understanding

of criteria

 

1Weaknesses far outweigh strengths; writer does not show understanding of criteria

 

COLUMN TOTAL 

Procedure:

Faculty committee developed the rubric.

Same committee, plus additional faculty, after a training session, scored a sample of student work.

Used rubric scores to address three questions:

1.   How well are our students doing?

a.   Each rubric item was awarded points.  Points for each paper were totaled.

b.   Report showed the percentage of student work that received at least 70 points.

 

2.   What factors make a difference in their writing competency?

a.   Report showed that 65% of students who had taken gen ed comp and lit courses met the 70% benchmark, while only 40% of students who had not taken those courses met the benchmark.

3.   What are strengths and weaknesses?

a.   Items with lowest average scores were identified.

b.   Lowest scores were citing sources, avoiding plagiarism, integrating material from sources into their writing, and checking their work against instructor criteria.

Source: Anne Arundel Community College Case Study in Walvoord and Anderson,

Effective

Grading

, 2nd ed., Jossey-Bass, 2010, pp. 181-185.

For Generic Rubrics

developed within a national project by Association of American

Colleges and Universities, see Value Program

at www.aacu.org.

 

Ho institution current.4

11

9

March 8, 2012

As we discussed in class, you must credit your material. Blogs don’t usually use APA format, but the good ones are very careful to cite others’ work. If they don’t, they will infuriate other bloggers. Those non-citers are also saying, in essence: ” Hey, I don’t cite. So you can take my stuff and don’t worry about ripping me off.” Also, they will lose credibility. In addition, because you are in my class, I can fail you.

Here is a piece of advice from the Write Spot:

If you have a website and are using someone else’s photo without getting their permission first, generally it will not be a problem if you are giving them credit for the photo, and linking to their website. Usually in these circumstances the photo owner will not ask you to take it down. But if they do, then you must comply.

To make the link above, I highlighted the words “Write Spot” and then clicked the link icon on the tool bar. The icon will only appear when you have highlighted at least one word.

Note: I have indicated clearly which text is a direct quote. Above I used italics. Below I use quote marks. Revkin (later in this post) also uses indentation.

What if I am posting material that is not from the web?

Caron Chess wrote in the American Journal of Public Health in 2008: “Improving risk communication about terrorism requires understanding not only responses to messages but also the organizations working to manage the risks.”

The above does not include an APA citation, but I let the reader know the source of the material. I also included a link to the site. I cannot include a link to the article because AJPH does not allow free access.

A professional shows how it is done.

Andrew Revkin of the New York Times is the author of an incisive blog about climate change. His blog is useful because he includes others’ ideas and writing. Here is how he gave credit in his column of October 15. (I have italicized this so you can see it more easily. All the links are from his column.)

Almost 20 years ago, Harold Lewis, a respected physicist who had advised the government and the Pentagon on matters ranging from nuclear winter to missile defense, included his assessment of climate change from the buildup of human-generated greenhouse gases in a book on technological risk:

All models agree that the net effect will be a general and global warming of the earth; they only disagree about how much. None suggest that it will be a minor effect, to be ignored while we go about our business. [ Read more.]

A couple of pages later, he laid out the implications of warming and the need for “global cooperation and sacrifice now, to avert something far in the future.” He noted that this was unlikely, given human nature, but said, “one can only hope.”

Revkin goes on to talk about how this same physicist recently resigned from a professional organization because the organization spent money on global warming.

A few other points…

Notice I included headings so you could read the post more easily. I used relevant links.

I have remembered to use my “real” name.  I cannot give you a grade if you  don’t indicate your real name.

Caron Chess

The blog assignment

October 28, 2011

You need to write two posts and post them on our blog.

One may be very short. Both must be good.

One should talk about plastic bags/reusable bags in general OR the Asbury Park campaign.

The second should NOT refer to plastic bags or the Asbury Park campaign. BUT you need to write the second post about the something relevant to the reader of the NJ Surfrider blog (e.g., beaches in NJ, surfing, suntan lotion, sandcastles, your favorite beach walk, fish, beaches in the spring, shore houses, marine issues etc.)

1.You will be more likely to do well if you read my post on how to get an “A.”

2. Read suggestions about blogs, including about the twenty approaches to blog posts.

3. MAKE SURE you read additional guidance about how you should write your blog.

4. Avoid stream of consciousness blogs posts.  Read other effective blogs. For example, read the ones featured on the home page of  wordpress.com

Finally, you must post to our blog. To do so, you must sign up with wordpress.

If you are NOT using your EDEN email, send me the appropriate email so I can add you as an author to this blog. If you are not an author, you cannot post.

Post before class on Tuesday

How to get an A on your blog posts

October 27, 2011

 

I bet some of you are wondering what it takes for get an A from this @#$% professor.  (Note the lead of your blog should be interesting to your target audience.)

I will review the quality of your blog posts based on the following criteria adapted from website 101.com

CHECKLIST FOR BLOGS

  •  Will your posts attract NJ Surfrider’s target audience? 
  •  Is the  topic clear to someone who only reads the headline?
  • Does the lead paragraph grab the reader?
  • Would someone who knows absolutely nothing about this topic understand this post?
  • Is the post interesting?  Zippy?  Will a member of the target audience want to keep reading it?
  • Have  you peppered the headline and the post with keywords and phrases that will be attractive to search engines?
  • Did you  remember to ask your readers a question at the end or  to include something to  stimulate readers to comment?
  •  Is your writing concise and clear?  Did you proofread it?
  • Did you cite appropriately?  (See my blog post about this.) 
  •  Did you write blog posts (rather than a research paper).  Do they look like blog posts?
  • Did you fulfill the requirements of the assignment?  (See below.) 
  • Did your post about the campaign/plastic bags/Asbury Park use appropriate behavioral tools, such as those we discussed for the Surfrider campaign?

Do you think this checklist is too long?   I do.  I included items that I should no longer need to mention.   For example, “concise and clear.”   If you don’t know that yet, you have slept through every class.    “Interesting.”  Isn’t that obvious?   “Target audience.” Where have you been?  However, because I am a kind professor, I included these items rather than say: “Use all the information you learned in class.”

Inserting photo

October 27, 2011

I inserted this photo from creative commons flickr.  First, I needed to make sure the photographer allowed it to be downloaded.  Many  awesome photos were restricted.   I chose the size photo I wanted.  (This is medium.)   I needed to download the photo to  my computer.  Then I used the upload photo function of wordpress to insert the photo.  If I can do this, anyone can.   I bet you can do this much better than I can.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/fontplaydotcom/2704876245/sizes/m/in/photostream/

The Scoop on Giving Credit on the WEB

October 26, 2011

As we discussed in class, you must credit your material. Blogs don’t usually use APA format, but the good ones are very careful to cite others’ work. If they don’t, they will infuriate other bloggers. Those non-citers are also saying, in essence: ” Hey, I don’t cite. So you can take my stuff and don’t worry about ripping me off.” Also, they will lose credibility. In addition, because you are in my class, I can fail you.

Here is a piece of advice from the Write Spot:

If you have a website and are using someone else’s photo without getting their permission first, generally it will not be a problem if you are giving them credit for the photo, and linking to their website. Usually in these circumstances the photo owner will not ask you to take it down. But if they do, then you must comply.

To make the link above, I highlighted the words “Write Spot” and then clicked the link icon on the tool bar. The icon will only appear when you have highlighted at least one word.

Note: I have indicated clearly which text is a direct quote. Above I used italics. Below I use quote marks. Revkin (later in this post) also uses indentation.

What if I am posting material that is not from the web?

Caron Chess wrote in the American Journal of Public Health in 2008: “Improving risk communication about terrorism requires understanding not only responses to messages but also the organizations working to manage the risks.”

The above does not include an APA citation, but I let the reader know the source of the material. I also included a link to the site. I cannot include a link to the article because AJPH does not allow free access.

A professional shows how it is done.

Andrew Revkin of the New York Times is the author of an incisive blog about climate change. His blog is useful because he includes others’ ideas and writing. Here is how he gave credit in his column of October 15. (I have italicized this so you can see it more easily. All the links are from his column.)

Almost 20 years ago, Harold Lewis, a respected physicist who had advised the government and the Pentagon on matters ranging from nuclear winter to missile defense, included his assessment of climate change from the buildup of human-generated greenhouse gases in a book on technological risk:

All models agree that the net effect will be a general and global warming of the earth; they only disagree about how much. None suggest that it will be a minor effect, to be ignored while we go about our business. [ Read more.]

A couple of pages later, he laid out the implications of warming and the need for “global cooperation and sacrifice now, to avert something far in the future.” He noted that this was unlikely, given human nature, but said, “one can only hope.”

Revkin goes on to talk about how this same physicist recently resigned from a professional organization because the organization spent money on global warming.

A few other points…

Notice I included headings so you could read the post more easily. I used relevant links.

I have remembered to use my “real” name.  I cannot give you a grade if you  don’t indicate your real name.

Caron Chess